Real Estate News Radio with Rowena Patton

The Future Is Now: Navigating the Deep Impact of AI on Society, Work, and Daily Life

December 23, 2023 Rowena Patton
Real Estate News Radio with Rowena Patton
The Future Is Now: Navigating the Deep Impact of AI on Society, Work, and Daily Life
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Let's unravel the complexities of artificial intelligence as it weaves into the fabric of real estate and beyond. Todd Phillips, an AI expert with a wealth of knowledge from his eight years in the industry, joins us to illuminate how these machines are not just learning to communicate like us, but also transforming the way we live and work. With AI's conversational skills hitting uncannily realistic levels, we wade into the depths of its impact on customer service, healthcare, and education, and the ethical quagmires it stirs.

Feel the undercurrent of change as we examine AI's role in our day-to-day interactions. Imagine a world where AI assistants are more than just helpful – they're indispensable, managing tasks with an efficiency that surpasses our own. Their ability to mimic human speech patterns is redefining what it means to interact with technology. We'll explore how this shift could lead to a future where we’re not just using AI, but relating to it on a personal level, and what that means for the jobs and relationships we hold dear.

Finally, brace yourself for a glimpse of an AI-powered horizon where the line between human and machine blurs. As we scrutinize the fate of employment in an AI-dominated landscape and the legal implications of technology that outpaces our laws, we ask the hard questions. Is it possible to find a balance that ensures AI benefits humanity without compromising our privacy and autonomy? Step into this enthralling journey with us and our esteemed guest Todd Phillips as we navigate the evolving world of AI and its profound effects on society.

Speaker 1:

This is the plain English real estate show with your host, rowena Patton, a show that focuses on the real estate market in terms you can easily understand. Call Rowena now. The number is 240 9962 1-800-570-9962. Now here's the English girl in the mountains, the agent that I would trust, rowena Patton.

Speaker 2:

Good morning and happy Christmas week to everybody. Have you been naughty or nice? I wonder. What do you think, Randy? Have you been naughty or nice?

Speaker 3:

I've been nice, nice. I don't need any coal in my stocking.

Speaker 2:

Let's hope everybody's been nice and then you'll get nice prezzies. There you go. We get to a certain age, though, right when we've been buying us that especially guys like they buy socks and t-shirts throughout the year that they need.

Speaker 3:

Amazon, it comes to your front door.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it must be even worse now we've got Amazon, because now you get the socks and the t-shirts and all that stuff that you need and then what do you get for presents?

Speaker 3:

You get a sweater. I like it.

Speaker 2:

An ugly Christmas sweater. So exciting show today. Well, I'm very excited. We're talking about all about AI and is it taking over the world? And what do we need to be scared of Gosh?

Speaker 3:

Artificial intelligence.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and we've got questions. We've done a lot of background work this week. We've got questions from DC, new York, los Angeles, chicago, san Francisco, miami, seattle, houston, boston and Atlanta. So we'll be reading all your questions, so get ready for that. If you'd like me to read your question, go to Rowena Pattern on Facebook, look me up, just go on that post and post your questions below and every 10 minutes or so I will check this morning and I will read your question. We should say good morning to Todd Phillips. Well, good morning. How are you, todd? So you're something of an expert in this business. How long have you been working in AI?

Speaker 4:

Oh gosh, I've been interested in working with AI for at least eight years.

Speaker 2:

Oh, you don't work in it, you work with it.

Speaker 4:

I work with AI.

Speaker 2:

Oh my gosh, I can't wait here. Can we just jump right into the first question? Bob from DC. So he asked why do these bots sound so real? It's a bit creepy. It is a bit creepy.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, sure is. The more and more we advance with AI, and especially in verbal ability, the ability to interact with human beings. Probably in the last 90 days it's just been that quick We've gone from very clunky, very difficult to understand and interact with to almost human-like in AI's ability to interact with us real time. It's really astonishing. Some people get very scared by that and I certainly understand those feelings. I tend to be a bit more optimistic. I think the more capable AI becomes in communication with human beings, the more we're going to accomplish with AI.

Speaker 2:

Well, that's, and I'll give a quick run through of the questions today, just so that if anybody wants to go on and look at Rowena Patten if you have any questions, this will give you kind of flavor of the questions we're going to be asking Todd today. So we've got Bob from DC said why did these bots sound so real? It's a bit creepy. We've got Alice from New York wondering can they speak like us? Charlie from Los Angeles is asking and he's talking about AI in our daily conversations Are they easy to understand or is it like this is funny? Is it like getting help from your bank down the road on the phone with somebody in India? We've got Emma from Chicago who asked will robots kill a lot of our jobs? Oh my goodness. David from San Francisco is questioning what role will AI play in healthcare? Seems like it's a big old database that might just do a better job than doctors, especially now you never even get to see a doc. I guess he's talking about the fact you usually get into a PA or something else or I don't know. You see them on Zoom or something. Now We've got Grace from Miami asking how will AI affect? Just so you're not in the hot sea here, todd, and you know what the questions are. Grace from Miami asks how will AI affect the education system? Will our kids be taught by parts Online? Stuff was so bad in COVID and we're going to go through these one by one. James from Seattle is exploring the big question is AI taking over the world? That's what we started up with today. Olivia from Houston wonders, and she's talking about in our personal lives. I love this one. Will it take over dating? Do they make a good companion? Can I have a bot boyfriend that chats with me on the phone? Ethan from Boston asks what will AI do in the future of work? That's interesting. Sophie from Atlanta raises concerns. What are the ethical considerations with bots and will they destroy human beings one day? These are real fears, right? Let's go back to Bob. Why do they sound so real? It's a bit creepy. You let me hear one the other day, todd. It was amazing. They can have all kinds of voices. You can even make it your voice now. They're conversational, right. They really do sound real.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, absolutely, as I do interviews like this about AI, one of the things that I find myself doing, because I've worked with it for so long, is just assuming everyone has some kind of a clear picture of what it is. What I want to do before we get into these questions is give a little bit of background so that we're all on the same page. Sure, all of us have a 30-dollars view of exactly, or at least close to what exactly we have with AI. It really comes down to this simple definition that I talk about a lot. It's the development of computer systems that are able to perform tasks at a human level. Normally, that would require human beings and now no longer requires human beings. That really helps people understand, hopefully, exactly what we're talking about, because this is a tectonic shift in our culture, not just the economy relationships. Based on the questions you were just showing us, it's really an overarching reality, just like the internet, but even more dramatic. None of us can imagine doing our jobs, for example, without a cell phone, doing our jobs without connection to the internet. How long would you last in your job if you had neither one of those?

Speaker 2:

Are you old enough to remember when we didn't have cell phones? Todd.

Speaker 4:

Oh, yes, I do. I remember the dial-up phones connected to the wall. I was so excited when it went from rotary phones to push-button Right. Yes, it was just crazy times. When I talk about this, and this is not to scare people, it's to help people understand and educate people on the reality of what we're going to see in the next not just years, but years, but months. The final frontier is AI. I always say we're going to see more change Ro in the next 60 months In the human condition. We're going to see more change in the next 60 months than we have in our entire lifetimes, the entire the last century of change, and all of us know the massive amount of changes that we've seen in the last 100 years. That'll happen again in the next 60 months, and I believe, when we're talking whether it's realtors, doctors, whatever it is that the next 24 to 36 months is the most important span of time in the life of a person's business or their profession. I can't stress that more. So that's the kind of thing we're talking about and some of the quotes from, I would say, the greatest thinkers in AI right now. Sundar Pachi he's the Google CEO, right, so he's not a fly by night guy. He said if you think about fire and listen to this, Ro, it's crazy. He said if you think about fire, electricity or the internet, he says AI is more profound.

Speaker 3:

Whoa.

Speaker 4:

So that's an astonishing statement.

Speaker 2:

Yes, All right, so it's. People don't fully understand.

Speaker 4:

It's true.

Speaker 2:

So what I'm concerned about here is there's already people shutting off because it all sounds so scary. So I want you to really elaborate on a lot of this. But let's go down on some of the direct questions they've asked you We've got and just remember, guys, go onto Facebook, look at Rowena Patten, r-o-w-e-n-a, p-a-t-t-o-n. I've got the post on there. I'm looking for your questions. We'll read everybody's. We've got so far that we went through. At the top of this, todd is obviously going to elaborate at length and give us a 60,000-foot view of what's going on here, but you've got some really straightforward questions. So Alice from New York is wondering can they speak like us? Oh my gosh, I've heard one, and what I'll do, todd, is I'll go ahead and, below our posts, I will. If you can send me a recording of one I'm sure you haven't got one live you can play us today. That would be awesome. We'll bring that maybe into next week's show so people can hear what they sound like, like an interview with one, to see what they really sound like. But I'll post, if you can send me a recording, maybe the one we did the other day. I will post that and people can listen to it because it's amazing. It really does sound like us. Ok, that's great, and all the different voices you have, and, of course, you can actually take somebody's actual voice and make them sound like the bot, correct? Yes?

Speaker 4:

absolutely yeah. It's quite amazing that they're almost indistinguishable from a human voice and the ability to reply or converse in real time. So one of the things we're finding with AI is that just give you an example of the bots that we use in our real estate marketing company we are engaging with multiple AIs and bringing them all together strategically from a technological perspective to be able to create voices that are pleasing to the ear. We've got a young male voice, we have a young American female voice, we have an older British voice, and we actually are able to take those voices, using them in our marketing company with real estate agents, and decide statistically which one is working better, and we've got to the point where we can get a percentage of comparative benefit right. So this voice is working better than that one, this one is better than that one, and we can change those voices at will and they sound exactly like the human being. They are indistinguishable from the conversation we're having.

Speaker 2:

Can we wait while with my voice? Todd, Would you like to use my voice and you can use it on your platform.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, we can. They're a little bit more involved when we're talking about interactive voice spots, I'm sure. But, Ro, here's the deal. Anyone can go right now to several websites. Several companies are doing this. 11 Labs is one that we use. 11 Labs. You can go in there and just give a sample of your voice, no longer than six seconds, Ro. They need six seconds of your voice and they can clone your voice and you can type in anything you want and that voice will speak in exactly the way that you do.

Speaker 2:

Wow, that's amazing.

Speaker 3:

In all these years of radio, we've always said and I remember the rotary phone too, todd but in all these years of radio we've always said that one of these days, one of these days well, I think it's here.

Speaker 2:

You know what's interesting? We could do a whole radio show, as me as the bot.

Speaker 3:

There's a radio station programming right now. Nobody, nobody, it's AI. Oh I bet yeah.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, because it's choosing, and also you have the technology now that can choose the music that people want to listen to. It's all research. It's so interesting in live time as well. And hey, tell me if you're listening today, tell me what you think about me doing a whole radio show as a bot, and would it sound like me? Go to Rowena Pattern on Facebook You'll see the post right at the top there on my profile and let me know if you'd like to hear a whole radio show with me as a bot. I guess the thing is you can take out any of the urns, sneezes, things that you know where you lose track and go down the left field. Now, the only thing I'd say about that is I think about what the internet did to newspapers. So you know, you used to pick up an. Do you remember old fashioned newspapers, todd?

Speaker 4:

Yes, I do.

Speaker 2:

Did you ever sit at a cafe in Paris drinking a lovely little cup of coffee, flicking through the newspaper? I mean, that's a nice vision, isn't it? But when you read through a newspaper, you would land on things that caught your eye, and it might not be something that you're exposed to on a daily basis, or you know, okay. So some people just look for the obituaries or some people just look for, you know, the I don't know the cartoons or something. But as you flick through a newspaper, you do go page to page. You don't just go to page 16 and look for what you're looking for. The difference in internet news is it feeds you what it thinks you want, which means especially for young minds. Their minds aren't formed yet and they haven't explored things. I mean, half of them are writing their essays and doing tests using chat, GBT, where it writes it for them, so your brain's not being expanded by all those things that you're not likely to see. I know I've done radio. Randy will testify to this. I've definitely done shows where I go off left field. I think I'm doing that right now actually, and the great thing and the dangerous thing about a bot is that it wouldn't necessarily do that you know. I know they're conversational, but it won't sort of use its brain to go somewhere that the person who's listening might actually go into. What do you think about that?

Speaker 4:

Well, actually, the bots are very similar now, in just that way, the bots are just a utilization of AI, so the more conversational they get with us, the more they are able to actually draw into our emotions, our thoughts, our preferences, just like social media and AI and social media does. So the more we interact with bots, this is what people, I don't think, understand fully. The negative feedback are positive, but mostly negative feedback loops that come with news and AI that pushes you toward what you already believe. It creates and connects you with stuff you already believe, so it doesn't, in large part, allow critical thinking and it makes it more challenging. And what you were saying about the youth is just that they don't know how to discern, which, I would argue, many adults know, but they don't know how to discern or understand the fact that AI is driving the way that they are thinking by that feedback loop Right, and so that's one of the biggest challenges.

Speaker 2:

I can see that. I can see that. Are you ready for another question?

Speaker 4:

Sure, todd's in the hot seat.

Speaker 2:

So Charlie from LA Inquires and he's talking about AI in our daily conversations. Are they easy to understand? Or is it like getting help from your bank down the road on the phone with somebody in India? You all know what we mean by that. Everybody got very tired, I think, over probably the last 20 years of calling into a help desk and being farmed out to gosh. The company's charged $6 an hour, so these probably people are probably being paid $2 or $3 an hour. You know a lot of this went off seas and you're talking to somebody you can't even understand. So, and it's a real life person. So the bots are probably going to be more intuitive than that. One of the things I love about the one that you played me the other day is sales people, for example, or customer service people are very scripted and sometimes they don't remember the script or they think they remember the script and they don't ask the questions. That make it much easier for us to help you. So, for example, if we built a bot in real estate that is asking you know, calling a buyer, then we're asking all the right questions if we're a bot, whereas a real life person may not, and that's not great service for the person who's thinking of buying in the next two years or six years or eight years or 10 years. Maybe they're getting ready for retirement and looking in our area, wherever that may be, and, you know, thinking about moving in the future. Well, we need to know that future date and we know that most human beings, especially in sales and sometimes customer service well, definitely, customer service, that's here and now. But in sales people are thinking about here and now, the thing right in front of them, and they may not follow up with you in two years time when you're actually thinking of retiring, and they may not follow up with you in a month to make sure your home search has been set up correctly. You know, are there any other elements that you want? Maybe one of you now is, I don't know, having wobbly knees and you don't want stairs anymore. So that search can get changed and a bot automatically will put the follow up in place to make sure everything gets taken care of. Is that right?

Speaker 4:

Absolutely. You know, the bot or AI in general. However, it's utilized right, it does not forget Now I want to put a caveat on that that it will improve again by an order of magnitude over the next six months. To get exactly where you're talking about, the only limitation it has right now is that there are certain numbers, there's parameters that these companies are putting in the system in place so that we can't they can't remember too much, because their concern is actually that it will remember too much and that will create a problem. But yeah, it's a very real concern. It's just very real and the greatest thinkers, greatest minds right now are actually addressing that. It's called the alignment issue, where AI needs to be aligned with humanity so it doesn't hurt humanity, Okay. But when it comes to the bots and their ability, or AI and its ability to remember things, you know it can actually talk, like we have again, we have real estate bots right so that they help agents call out to potential clients, etc. We have those bots already integrated with texting and email and the calendar so that it can do just what you're talking about it can set up a reminder two years from now and it will not forget that that reminder's there because it'll look into the future on the calendar and know exactly what they need to do and there will be very few of any errors when it comes to that kind of engagement. You mentioned one thing, ro, about the voice and that we were talking about the Indian. They were calling and have somebody from India.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that was Charlie from Los Angeles. Thank you, Charlie, for listening.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so that's a real thing. What I find interesting is we've developed our bots is that we actually develop our bots to use ums and us and strategic causes.

Speaker 2:

Oh my.

Speaker 4:

One thing we found. We found this that it being too perfect is a problem. People don't respond quite as well to it being what we would call too perfect.

Speaker 2:

Yes, it makes sense it's funny, so I can share something in. You know so. A lot of real estate agents, a lot of salespeople, have what we call the drip campaigns, so it will ping you on text with a number of messages. The way is so for hours would be do you still like your search? Are the properties coming through? Are there any changes you want made? And that's really so that you know we can help a much larger number of people. And it's a service Like you can just text back and say well, actually I've decided I need four bedrooms now, or I don't know, I'm getting divorced and I need one bedroom and cut the price in half or whatever it is. So it's like having an assistant that's how I'm seeing it that can check in with you when you know let's face it, especially salespeople and customer service people get too busy. You call into a customer service line. You might be waiting for half an hour. That isn't going to happen with a bot, correct?

Speaker 4:

That's correct. I mean, that's where the sea change is going to happen, especially in sales, where people that you know have a specific profession that are kind of working by themselves Just bother the again. Ai, however they want to interface with it, is now and will be far more capable in the next six months, to the point where you'll simply be able to talk to your phone. You won't have to say hey, siri, or anything like that, because Siri is what I would call a six month old baby compared to what you're going to see with a full grown AI. You'll just be able to talk to him or her, pick a voice you like to, can name you like, and that person will be your virtual assistant, your AI assistant, and it will become. You will have a difficult time not calling it him or her and seeing them as a relationship that you have.

Speaker 2:

Well, we're going to. Well, maybe we'll skip to that in a minute, because there's a whole question on that, which I think is fascinating. I know there are. Do you know? There are already apps online, randy, that give you an AI boyfriend. You can build the picture of them and they're more like a bit of a cartoon, but you can chat with them. Amazing. You go, you know, two o'clock in the morning, you can, you call them whatever you want to call them. Maybe you're, maybe you don't have a partner, or, or I don't know, your partner doesn't talk to you very much, or something. So, you know, you can make one. I actually went and played with it and I wasn't cheating on Randy, I actually called it Randy and it built this person and it chats to you. So imagine, as that actually goes on, and we've got a direct question about that. So, however, emma from Chicago, I want to make sure I get you all in turn. So this is the order the questions came in at. Thank you for listening, emma. In Chicago, she says will robots kill all of our jobs? What do you think to that? Todd, you're really in the hot seat now.

Speaker 4:

Well, you know there's a lot of discussion on exactly what that is right, because you know the internet is not inherently that are good. People that use the internet for that are good. The key right. So with AI, same same kind of thing, robots are advancing by an order of magnitude, hundreds, thousands of times faster now than they were over the last 50 years. It's just no comparison. The, the strides that we're making your robotics is just hard to wrap our minds around. And I think again, I'm more optimistic. I would say I'm. You know, I'm not in the middle. You know that it's going to. It's going to destroy the world versus it's going to be our savior. I tend to be about 70% of the good. I really believe we have an opportunity to transform the world in a better way. But the my gosh, ro, I just lost my question. What'd you just ask me?

Speaker 2:

It's all right, it happens to me all the time. See, see, if you were a bot, you wouldn't be losing the question right now.

Speaker 1:

Emma from.

Speaker 2:

Chicago Pundas. Will robots kill all of our jobs?

Speaker 1:

Thank, you for that question.

Speaker 2:

Emma.

Speaker 4:

No, no, you're all good.

Speaker 2:

Thank you for that question, emma, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 4:

So robots they've. They've advanced so much that they're going to be a very, very much a part of our lives everywhere. You're going to see them in the grocery stores and at airports and you know, very soon next five, 10 years, you will have a personal bot, very likely in your home. And that robot will you know. You've seen movies. This has all been fiction our entire lives, but it's becoming very much a reality. They will be an ever present reality in your home. They'll be assisting you, they'll do the chores. I mean, this is real stuff, it's already happening. It also will have a massive impact on business and industry.

Speaker 2:

So do you mean physical robots that help yeah?

Speaker 1:

I have the.

Speaker 2:

AI built in, so could you put your stuff in your dishwasher for you?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, and again we were talking about that whole idea of having a relationship with a bot or with you know, in a digital sense. You know the advances are so astonishing. You will be able to have these relationships and feel a very strong emotional connection, both to your digital assistant on your phone and then the real robot in your home.

Speaker 2:

Well, I want to give Olivia from Houston a shout out here. So Olivia from Houston wonders will it take over dating? Do they make a good companion? So I did play with one, just because I thought it was interesting and I wanted to see what it did. And I think it again. You know, the good side of that is people who are lonely, people who don't want to reach out about things, maybe can have that companion. And that companion, dare I say it could actually I'm going to scare all the therapists out there right now could be a therapist. So you think about the data bank of therapy that is out there that they can pull on, and it's not just like go to, you know, section VI or something and read this thing back. They're interactive and conversational. So somebody who's feeling suicidal, maybe, or somebody who's just, you know, low and not wanting to, hey, maybe they've got a partner that's I don't know an alcoholic and right now they're on a Facebook group for, you know, alcoholic companions. Or maybe they've got a drug problem and they can't tell their friends and family about that, that it could be a companion that helps them through that and gives them all kinds of advice on what to do, where to go that kind of thing, maybe even diagnosing different kinds of psychosis. It's scary, isn't it? That companion? What do you think about that?

Speaker 4:

Oh yes, it's well in the way and kind of the genies out of the bottle, for better or worse, when it comes to that very thing. When it comes to counseling, they're already doing that, but people are using chat GPT. I'm sure most of your listeners are aware of that. There are people are using just basic large language learning models, these AI learning models, to literally speak to chat GPT and have chat GPT talk back with them in a relational way about their problems.

Speaker 2:

Wow.

Speaker 4:

Imagine, if you can imagine, a therapist who has a perfect mind and perfect recall who can? Access the entirety of therapy and therapeutic philosophy for all of humankind that is digitized.

Speaker 2:

The best in the world.

Speaker 4:

They can get that information immediately and come back and give you input. How good would that be.

Speaker 3:

Wow, wow. But it brings up questions like does that bot or a share that information with?

Speaker 2:

who yeah, who yeah.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, that comes back to the alignment, alignment Right. Is it a human flourishing or can it manipulate us and actually tell us things and lie to us to its own benefit? And that's where you start to get into a really dark place. But they are very real questions and they are significant and it is the major question that the greatest minds right now in AI are thinking about, to the point where, eight months ago, all these leaders and thinkers from all these big companies doing AI, they had an open letter. I think it was signed by a thousand people. Oh, I saw that and we need to slow down on AI and stop moving forward until we get the alignment issue taken care of. Now that didn't happen, but the fact that that letter was written is very telling.

Speaker 2:

It is very telling the greatest minds who could make an awful lot of money out of this. So the fact that they are saying we need to slow down is really quite amazing. And I want to come back to a point you made about the genie being out of the bag already with some of these things. You don't know where it's going, you don't know what you've got until it's gone. So it's kind of like I want to think about screen technology or speaker technology. Screen and battery technology particularly has changed so much in really the last five years. So screens became very cheap. Anybody that's gone to buy a TV recently in the last few years know that that 80 inch screen that you used to pay $8,000 for you can now buy for $1,000. If you want to go and buy a decent sized TV for the bedroom or even your main room that's 50 inches or 40 inches what are you talking about? $250. And they're interactive and you can screen on them. So that's just TVs. So all our TVs became cheaper and thinner and everything else and lighter and you put them on the wall and see them at different angles. But let's think about what they've done with screens. Screens are interact fast food restaurants. Now you touch screens. They're building screens into everything you could possibly think of, but none of us knew that when screens got really cheap, they just went oh great, screens are really cheap, but they're being built into absolutely everything. You can send out mailers now with little screens in them because they're so cheap, with a little video that plays on them. So you don't know, until you let the genie out of the bottle, how it's going to play out, and I guess that is what that letter was about, todd. So move slowly, focus on one area, test it for a little while and see what happens, but unfortunately, that little while it moves so quick in AI that a little while has really got to play out for a year or least. I don't know what I'm talking about here. I'm certainly no expert, but I would think you've got to let it run around for a year to find out, and then it might be too late.

Speaker 4:

Well, we're talking measurable, statistically valid increases in the power and the ability of AI on a daily basis. Yes, so the kinds of changes we're looking at are quite remarkable. I tell this to a lot of people when I do presentations, so walk through this with me just for a few minutes. In 1996, you guys remember the Motorola StarTac, that phone. That was its first foldable phone. Yes, right, you do right. So that was about a fourth of the price of that big phone people used to carry around before that.

Speaker 2:

In the briefcase.

Speaker 4:

It was remarkable Bagpipes. That was in 1996. And then, in 2007, steve Jobs pulls out the iPhone right, does a presentation. The iPhone 750 bucks, a million dollars worth of software on board that thing. More tech inside the iPhone one than in the entire Apollo moon landing, wow, okay. More tech in the phone than it took to get the first man to the moon. It's got cameras, apps, internet access and all that Even in 2014,. Seven years later comes the Apple Watch. The price is going down dramatically, the size of the technology is getting smaller and smaller and smaller, and the potential of it using AI is going up by 10 fold, 100 fold, a thousand fold within 12 months. That's the kind of change we're seeing.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, we saw prices of screens drop 50% every year. They were dropping, but we're talking about, in half a day, ai is quadrupling, a thousand timesing its capabilities becoming more human, becoming, or human like not becoming more human. That sounds really creepy. Gosh, we could talk about this all day. Todd, I want to get back to the questions. Make sure we get the people who've taken the time to put these in. We didn't talk about Emma from Chicago killing all of our jobs because, unlike a bot, we went down left field, both you and me. So I want to come back to that a little bit. I think maybe it will create other jobs and jobs will be different. I mean, we've already got robots in medicine, but we've had robots in medicine for a very long time. However, we still have surgeons. I wonder if the robots took away any of the jobs of surgeons. They still seem to be really busy.

Speaker 3:

I had robotic surgery less than a year ago Wow, but the surgeon was controlling the robot.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's interesting. So I think the answer to that question probably why we both skipped it is we don't know right now. So newscasters are talking about this all the time. If you watch TV and any of the new shows, they're saying well, what will happen to journalism? You know what about writing stories? And that's kind of interesting in itself because you can go into chat GBT, for example, and say write me a news article with this bent. So if your audience is older, for example, you can say give me a news story based on the environment, with an angle towards demographics of people that are 60 and older, or 40, between 40 and 60, whatever it is that do or don't agree, you know, choose one with environmental changes and it will spew out that story with that angle without somebody having to get up at 4am in the morning and writing it. So I think journalists are very worried. Do you have any insight on that? Todd? I'm putting you on the seat here.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, every profession in almost equal ways. Goldman Sachs actually said that in the next five years, 300 million jobs will be lost or diminished. Wow, now there are and that's in the US and the European Union. There are nearly 900 million, almost a billion jobs in the EU and the US. That means that one out of every three will be impacted in a negative way.

Speaker 2:

So with AI. So if you're younger right now or you have children or grandchildren I guess what was your thinking, be thinking about which we've had a massive shift towards, I think, in perhaps the last five years of the trades. So, and the trades, interestingly, have paid more and more and more in that period of time, certainly in the last 10 years. So I think people are saying to their kids things like go learn to be a plumber, go learn to work in construction, go learn to do physical jobs, because that I mean we can't say they won't ever be replaced either, but they'll be the last to go. I mean, do you really want a robot in your house fixing under the sink? I don't know Like it's? So I think people are turning to the trades and wear your hands on. So you know, I'm thinking about my profession real estate agents. There's already a company out there that is putting a lockbox on and you just let somebody wander around your house. I think that's creepy, frankly. I think people want a real life person and they will pay a little bit more money for it or have it, you know, built into the sales in some way, which it really is now, won't get into the whole lawsuit going on around that for buyers, agents, but that's how it is now. Most people prefer someone to open the door and have local knowledge about what's going on in the market and everything else. So what do you think about that? Like the actual physical jobs, I think, whatever those physical jobs are, where you're going out meeting people we call it belly to belly will be the last to go. So if I were younger right now, I think I'd maybe be thinking about that. I think I'd think hard and fast about going into journalism. I definitely would think about going into an AI company, no doubt. In fact, I'm fascinated by it. So I want some shares in your company, todd. But you know, I'd also think if I were advising my grandkids or kids or for our younger listeners. You know, think about things you can do, where a robot's going to be last on the list and will it take over one day? Maybe we don't know. Imagine if you could hear this broadcast in a hundred years. It would be so funny. I guess you will be able to see this broadcast, yeah, but you know, is there something in that? Because you can be a plumber making six figures quite easily.

Speaker 4:

Yeah. So there's a lot of discussion on this in reference to jobs and the shifts that are coming with artificial intelligence, the trades. You are correct, we don't know how long that will stay, but over the next few years I believe that's a safe bet. The problem is when you try to build a career out of something really across the board, based on your perspective on AI, right. So at some point we have to make a choice, at some point we have to take a career. So I think, I think in a lot of ways and I've read a lot on this that the trades are very strong in the inner. You know, kind of the medium term, like three to five, six years, but those changes with robots are coming as well. They just are. And then I would tell young people trades are an option, but really focusing in on what is last to go in human interaction, like you were just saying right. So real estate, although I think that the real estate industry as a whole is going to change where it is utterly unrecognizable in the next 24 to 36 months, like many professions. And then I also tell young people all the time ago just lean into AI. You know that's the bottom line If you're going to educate yourself and go to what I think is largely and I get pushed back on this all time I think undergraduate degrees are going to be and largely are currently irrelevant. The kind of education you can receive online in the area of interest is far greater, and when AI starts to become part of that, it's just going to take over the educational system and, I think, in a positive way. Yes, but I tell people I'm young people get into tech, get into AI, lean into it, become an expert in a specific sector. You know real estate law, whatever it is, and lean into the AI reality there and use your education to better yourself in that area to get ahead.

Speaker 2:

I'm looking at the low risk of automation jobs with the highest projected growth by 2032. So that gives us six, seven, eight years. Nurse practitioner is number one 45.7% growth. And that's because people exactly what we started talking about you don't get to see the doctor. It was the question earlier. Choreographers that's interesting 29.7% growth how interesting. Physician assistants same thing as the nurse practitioners, I think 27%, nearly 28% growth they're forecasting. So this is growth in job markets that they're forecasting. Mental health practitioners 22.1%. Nursing instructors and teachers post-secondary 21.5%. Coaches and scouts 20%. It'd be kind of weird having a bot you know, help your kids with Little League Athletic trainers nearly 18% growth in that job. Physical therapists I have a very good friend, lydia Rallo. I'll give her a shout out here. Actually, she just got married. Sorry, I used to made a name. I was in her wedding a few weeks ago. Physical therapists nearly 17% growth. Authentists and prosthetists I don't know, I can say one of those. 17%. Occupational therapists so many of those in medical, which is very interesting. I've got a whole list of them. If you want to go and post on my Facebook page, I will send that list out to you. Chief executives there's another interesting one Fish and Game Wardens yeah, it'd be kind of hard to replace. So there are lots of them. You can Google it or just go look me up. Rowena Patton comment on the post about the show today. You can put questions in there. You can ask for whatever you want and I'll DM it over to you on Facebook. Most of you have got Facebook. It's on Instagram and all the others as well. So there's 65 jobs with the lowest risk of automation. I'd be happy to get that list out to you. So I think for most people's lifetimes. So you're thinking about somebody that's 20 now. They're going to be working for 40 years, or maybe people most people want to retire earlier 30 years and probably there'll be an awful lot of jobs around. Let's face it. Your dad will tell you, or your grandparents certainly will tell you, that they used to have a job for life that went away a long time ago. We have to reinvent themselves. Oh my gosh. I think about me. So going through college, I cleaned narrow boats like Camel barges. I worked in all kinds of part-time jobs, retail jobs, and then I worked for a marketing company and then started a marketing company and a PR company and a photographic company for 10 years. I was a management consultant for eight years. Internationally, it's probably the most fun I've had in my career, or certainly took me to a whole other level. I wouldn't necessarily say the most fun, sorry guys, if I worked with you. And then real estate, which you know. Real estate. Even in real estate you have to keep reinventing yourself. So I was out in the field helping buyers and sellers back in 2007,. We went through the economic cycle good old Clemence Euglard seven to 11 years. We go down for three and a half to five and a half years. We're in that cycle now and then we go up for three and a half to five and a half years. We'll be in that in three and a half to five and a half years where prices are going back up again. It's a normal cycle. It's been going on since 1860. So I started training and coaching which is really my love back in 2008,. I've taught in 60 different offices around the country and now we're in cash GPO. We've reinvented again, where we do full market value cash offers and you know people don't have to have showings. It's a full market value offer. You get 70% big cash advance at 70% within 12 days. You don't have to have a contingent purchase on your new home. You're going into assisted living. You can put your money down right away. You're not scared of that. We use our funding partners money to refresh your home and then you get on average another 20 to 50% on top, so two-thirds of the sellers get more money. It's a complete reinvention of real estate and we've got 1,100 agents doing it around the country. I should mention I'm Rowena Patten. All Star Powerhouse broke it by EXP when I say that I have to do that. So what do you think about the reinvention, todd?

Speaker 4:

Well, I think we're going to have to be very nimble in the coming economy over the next three to five years. So I said 60 months is really the outside of it. I would tell people that I think the core, the most important thing they can do, in whatever profession they're in, is to lean into AI education, educate themselves and become a daily learner in regard to AI and their particular profession if they're interested in staying in that profession for a long time. But I also do think there are going to be some major disruptions in certain areas that require people to make very, very fast changes in their career trajectory or they're going to miss out. It's going to be very challenging. So the education component in your industry, your field, is a key. If a person chooses not to be proactive, I think it will be a very detrimental and kind of a negative impact on their careers and the trajectory moving forward, their ability to make money or they can lean into it, understand it, utilize it, leverage it for their business and have a massive impact in a positive way. Get them ahead of the game.

Speaker 2:

You know I love that. So we think about a nurse practitioner, for example. Ai can take the questions from the person sitting there, or AI, the Bart or the very human like person could be. You know, you wait a very long time, especially when sometimes even in the emergency room you wait a very long time. And imagine having that AI bot that can do the intake and then you meet with the nurse practitioner. So a lot of the questions would be answered already, saving them a lot of time and allowing them to meet with many more patients with you know some bullet points of what's gone over, already written in something that so okay, so you go in, you go into the ER or you go in to urgent care, say, and you're saying I don't know, I'm having these symptoms and this is going on and oh my gosh, my brother just passed away, so it may be stress, and you're just saying all this stuff that is not organized, especially as somebody in distress, and the bot basically interacts with you in a human like way and organizes all those thoughts and takes out the ones that aren't necessary and then feeds them in a very organized way that a nurse practitioner or a doctor or surgeon or whomever is seeing you, let's face it, it's not. It's going to be the people on the front line at that point so that they can very quickly ask you the right questions to make sure they're getting it right to the best of their ability. But now it takes five minutes instead of 15 minutes for them because the bot's already done it. That allows that medical establishment to A make a lot more money so, guys, you got to be looking into this right and B see a lot more patients. That makes them a lot more money. C quite possibly diagnose people faster and more accurately. What do you think? I mean? That's not taking jobs, right, that's assisting the jobs. That's assisting the jobs and improving. You know what's in place already. So the same thing with a trade, actually. So if you think about let's think about a trade, a lot of this is an assistant place. So you know you've got a plumbing assistant that's going out because nobody else is there and somebody's got a leak. So now you can send somebody out. That's got that assistant, and the assistant even is going to be able to look at images. They can do that already, right? Does anybody use Google scanner? And it can look at an image and go through its database of millions of things. So you take a picture underneath and you know you interact with the real life person that knows everything about not real life person, sorry, human like but that knows everything about plumbing and you're telling them everything that's going on, along with the homeowner that's standing there with you and it gets diagnosed very quickly, if you like. The plumbing problem gets diagnosed and then whether you've got the parts in stock get diagnosed, or it tells you to go to box 631 in your plumbing van and get that piece out, and then what to do next, step by step. That's an assistant that can help you fix the problem much faster.

Speaker 4:

I mean, that's what we're going to get into over the next couple of years. Is that kind of co-mingling of human and. AI interaction with medicine or whatever that you know what they're doing. We already have this technology, but when you apply AI to the diagnosis, it's quite remarkable. We have an Apple watch, for example. What we're going to be continuing to do is improve that kind of technology where much of the diagnostic effort in a person's you know, whatever their symptoms are, the diagnostic ability of an Apple watch connected to the internet, which connects to the physician's office, is going to be quite remarkable. So 90%, 95% of the diagnostic efforts for a given condition or a person not feeling well is going to be handled by just having something on our body that already tells the physician what needs to be done, and actually more often than going to the physician. Basically, this will be approved, where AI can read the Apple watch, go ahead and actually diagnose you.

Speaker 2:

Andra companies fighting that, though, won't they make a lot less money? I guess it could be used both ways.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, the legal battles. Here's the challenge.

Speaker 2:

Haven't even started.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, we're not going to be able to keep up with that. The technology is outpacing our legal system already by leaps and bounds and that's the biggest concern that this technology will expand so fast. We simply will not any longer be able to catch up to the changes.

Speaker 2:

We have about six minutes left and three more questions. One is will it take over the world? So I think we're covering that as we go, but thank you, james from Seattle for sending that one in. I mean lawyers, think about how long lawyers take to research everything. Imagine putting that into a massive database where you talk to a bot to do the intake and it's like the assistant, but it's not just a legal assistant. It knows the best legal questions and the legal precedents that are worldwide, you know, or in your jurisdiction or the federal level of that. Imagine how fast it could get through your case. Imagine when you spend $350 to go and see the attorney for the first meeting. What if you didn't have to do that? And you're just talking to a legal bot and you say well, listen, this is what's going on with my life. I'm divorcing my wife, we've got two children and it interacts with you and asks all the right questions, which a lot of people don't. I want to make sure. So the legal implications there are pretty amazing I want to look at. I want to make sure we get these other two questions in and again, thank you. Oh, grace from Miami asks how will AI affect the education system. Will our kids be taught by bots? Online stuff was so bad in COVID. This is very different from online stuff, isn't it?

Speaker 4:

Yes, the interactive capability of AI right now is just again. It's just at the beginnings. In the next 12 months Again I talk about this people will go. No, it's going to take three years. Well, either way, it's a blink of an eye.

Speaker 2:

Yes, we're going to do another show in six months and see how much we're going to do the same questions and see how much it's changed. So think about that for a minute. My brain likes to be creative. I can't help it, I'm sorry. So think about homeschoolers. Instead of your kids going on and following modules, which are very well done. I have online modules, even if you could have a hologram of a teacher there, of the kind of teacher that they would like, ie, they describe it and the teacher interacts with you. Again, of the best minds in history if it's a history class and they can teach you all the different lessons, or you can have 12 different teachers throughout the day. That could be very interesting. I just want to make sure we get to these two in our last couple of minutes here. How did that happen, todd? So Ethan from Boston asks what will AI do to the future of work? I think we've covered that one from you, ethan. If not, go look me up, rowena Patten, on Facebook, and just post the comment under there. I'd love to hear your comments on today's show. We've got. Sophie from Atlanta raises concerns. What are the ethical considerations with bots and will they destroy human beings one day. I think we've covered that in the alignment piece, so roll us up, todd. We've got another minute. A minute, oh my gosh. This is so fascinating today. Thank you so much. If anybody wants to know more about AI or interview him as an expert, or know more about this company and what they're doing, contact me, mountainhomehuntcom. Mountainhomehuntcom. Click on contact and I'll put all your details across to Todd. So what are your final thoughts on this, todd? We've got about a minute left.

Speaker 4:

Sure Row. First of all, thanks for inviting me on your show. This has been exciting. I'm looking forward to potentially having some more time, six or 12 months down the road, to see where we really are and listen back on the conversation we had, so it's very exciting for me. I just would really encourage people to choose to think optimistically. Just choose to. I believe I'm very optimistic in the sense that I believe AI is going to have a massive impact on humanity in a very positive way. So that's number one. Number two learn, learn, learn, Educate yourself. Read daily about AI. I know that might be overwhelming, but if those look, you're not going to lose your job to AI. You're going to lose your job to someone who leverages AI.

Speaker 2:

Yes, I totally agree with that yeah.

Speaker 4:

So educating them, educating yourself, is probably the most important thing. So, those two things are important. Thanks again.

Speaker 2:

Thank you so much, and we'll have an AI bot that teaches us about AI very soon in the industry or the things that we care about. Thank you so much, todd. That was absolutely amazing. Rowena Patton, here on the Real Estate News Radio Show. I bring all kinds of topics and things that you ask me for. Thank you for listening today. Happy Christmas, everybody. We'll see you next week.

Speaker 1:

This has been the Plain English Real Estate Show with Rowena Patton. Get Rowena and post your questions at radioashvillecom or call her at 828-210-1648.

AI in Real Estate
Impact of AI in Conversations
The Impact of Robots and AI
AI's Impact on Jobs
AI's Impact on Careers and Education
Real Estate News Radio Show